Personen

Vincent von Henke (USA)

Vincent von Henke (hier links op de foto met de M1 Thompson) tijdens de oorlog. Foto is gemaakt in maart 1945, maar helaas is de plaats waar deze foto gemaakt is niet bekend. Collectie: J van der Steen

English

On Thursday, March 1st 1945 came the long awaited liberation on which the civilians of Roermond had been waiting so long. On this morning the 15th Cavalry Group arrived in the city around 7.00 a.m.. The first American to enter the city was Master Sergeant Vincent von Henke.

Who was Master Sergeant Vincent von Henke?

On July 14th 1913 Vincent Astor von Henke was born in the state of Pennsylvania as the oldest son of a French/German father and a Polish/Russian mother. He became an American citizen and was named after Vincent Astor, the famous American industrialist. Sophie, the older sister who was born in Poland, lived with his mother’s family in Poland. At the age of 4 he and his younger brother Thomas Jefferson von Henke, who was named after the famous president, were send together with their mother to Poland. Their father stayed in America.

The boys grew up and went to various military schools in Poland, Germany and other European countries. Their father, in the meantime, had build a large and very successful company and decided they (in their very early 20’s) needed to come to the United States of America and their father enrolled them in different prestigious colleges to prepare them for their lives as businessmen.

After a while World War II broke out and Thomas, who never seemed to have an accent at all, enlisted in the Navy. Vincent went and tried to enlist in the Army. His accent was thick and therefore he was refused to join. Even showing his birth certificate did nothing to sway them. So he had to go to court. That did it. He joined the Army on September 16, 1941.
His Army Serial Number was 36048181. The first digit meant that he was a draftee who served with the National Army and the second digit corresponded to the region where he entered service (6 = Sixth Corps Area).

Unfortunately his service records were destroyed during a fire at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis on July 12, 1973. Therefore it’s hard to describe his time in the service. Also he didn’t talk often about this period.

His self-made jacket tells more about the units he served in.

  • 1941-1943 5th Armored Division
  • 1944 82nd Airborne Division
  • 1944 17th Airborne Division
  • 1944 XIX Corps
  • 1945 XVI Corps
  • 1945 Ninth Army
  • 1945 Seventh Army

What else is known about his time in the service:

For a while Von Henke was attached to the Headquarters of the 17th Airborne Division and had received the Gilder Wings badge. This badge was awarded for either passing a qualification course or making a combat landing in a glider. Together with the 17th Airborne Division he was sent to the Belgium Ardennes, where Germany had launched a big offensive on the Western front on December 16, 1944. This was Germany’s last big offensive on the western front.

During the war he earned the nickname: The Sidewinder. Named after the notorious snake. He earned this name, because of his working method at the frontlines or even behind enemy lines.

He was a musician (played several instruments) and played in an Army band.

Because of his thick accent he came in a few risky situations. Like the following situation: During a mission he had valuable information he had to report, but on the way he was stopped by own troops. These soldiers did not believe he was an American. One of the man said to him: “If you’re an American, I’m Santa Claus”. They made him dig a hole and get into it. Just then a jeep drove up and stopped along side the hole. The driver looked down and said: “What are you doing in that hole Sarge? We have to get going!”. Von Henke replied that he was waiting to get shot. The driver jumped out of the jeep and got the men to come over and told just how important he was to the American effort and that they did not had to shoot him. As they drove off, they heard every man there saying “Ho Ho Ho”.

Months later, meanwhile attached to the Military Intelligence Service of the XVI Corps, von Henke received on Tuesday February 27, 1945 the order to report himself the next day at the Intelligence Officer of the 15th Cavalry Squadron Captain Paul Williams, who had his headquarters in Linne (just south of Roermond). On February 28th the plan was made for a night reconnaissance mission to Roermond. XVI Corps G-2 (intelligence) reports on that afternoon indicated that the Germans had redrawn from Roermond. That night Von Henke, together with Captain Bob Hamsley’s B Troop (15th Cavalry Squadron) went on their way to Roermond and tried to reach the south bank of the Roer river.

After the war Von Henke wrote the following about his arrival in Roermond: “In the cellar of a destroyed factory near Merum I had a briefing with men of Captain Hamsley whose Troop B was to advance to the edge of Roer river later that night. In the darkness of the early morning March 1st, I slid down the cement slab of the blown-up bridge on the Maastrichtsche weg, and worked my way up the other side of the destroyed bridge. I was in Roermond… somewhat on the cold and wet side. Infantry men rigged up rubber boat and got over the Roer River shortly thereafter. On the edge of the town square was a building with red cross painted on the door. Inside of it I found many of town’s women and children, scared and cold. I asked them in German language, whether they had seen any enemy soldiers near-by. It took them sometime to realise that it was not a German but an American soldier talking to them.”
For several operations, behind enemy lines, he received the Bronze Star Medal and citation signed by Major General John B Anderson.
On Wednesday June 6, 1945 Von Henke was invited at the commemoration for the liberators of Roermond. During this commemoration on the market square von Henke received the city shield in Glass in Lead. A part of the Maastrichterweg was named after Major General John B Anderson who was also present that day. A parade was held, which also included the 15th Cavalry Group.
After the war ended he started to work again in his fathers company (American Electric Fusion Corporation in Chicago) and travelled all over the world to sell the products his father invented. He spoke 7 languages and came often home with souvenirs from the countries he had visited. He was also director of the alcoholism rehabilitation unit of the Northeast Community Hospital.
Eventually he married with Jane in June 1966, who he knew before the war. Jane had 2 children.
After the war he thought a lot of Roermond and kept in touch with several people of Roermond and surrounding villages. In 1982 he visited the city.
Vincent Astor von Henke died on July 24, 1990 at the age of 77.

On March 1, 2015 a plaque was revealed near the Roer river bridge in Roermond dedicated to Vincent von Henke and March 1st 1945.

Our special thanks goes out to Janice Amos (United States of America), Jeffery Riddel (United States of America) and Jan van der Steen (The Netherlands) for providing the above information and pictures.
To make the story of Vincent von Henke as complete as possible, we are still looking for more information about him. Please contact us if you have some more information which you would like to share.

Article by: Richard van Kessel

Nederlands

Op donderdag 1 maart 1945 kwam de lang verwachte bevrijding waar de burgerbevolking van Roermond zo naar uit gekeken had. Omstreeks 7.00 uur op die donderdagmorgen, arriveerde de Amerikanen van de 15th Cavalry Group, via de puinhopen van de Michielsbrug, in de stad. De Amerikaan die als eerste in de stad aan kwam was Master Sergeant Vincent von Henke.

Wie was Master Sergeant Vincent von Henke?

Op 14 juli 1913 werd Vincent Astor von Henke als oudste zoon van een Duits/Franse vader en een Pools/Russische moeder in de Amerikaanse staat Pennsylvanië geboren. Hij kreeg de Amerikaanse nationaliteit en werd vernoemd naar de beroemde Amerikaanse industrieel Vincent Astor. Sophie, de in Polen geboren oudere zus, was in Polen bij zijn moeders familie. Op 4 jarige leeftijd gingen Von Henke en zijn, inmiddels geboren jongere broer Thomas Jefferson, vernoemd naar de gelijknamige Amerikaanse president, samen met hun moeder ook naar Polen om daar verder hun jeugd door te brengen. Vader bleef in Amerika achter waar hij een eigen bedrijf had opgestart.

De beide jongens groeide op en doorliepen verschillende militaire academies in Polen, Duitsland en andere Europese landen. Ondertussen had hun vader een goed en succesvol bedrijf in Amerika en werd er zodoende door de ouders besloten om beide jongens (inmiddels beiden vroeg in de 20) naar Amerika te sturen om daar studies te gaan volgen en ze zo voor te bereiden op een leven als zakenman.

Na een aantal jaren brak de Tweede Wereldoorlog uit en Thomas besloot in dienst te gaan bij de Amerikaanse Marine. In het geval van Vincent ging het in dienst treden minder gemakkelijk, aangezien hij, in tegenstelling tot zijn broer, een zwaar accent had. Door dit accent werd hij geweigerd. Zelfs de geboorteakte veranderde niets aan de zaak, maar vastbesloten om toch in dienst te treden stapte hij naar de rechter. Uiteindelijk trad hij op 16 september 1941 in dienst van het leger.
Zijn Army Serial Number was 36048181. Wat betekend dat hij een rekruut was van de National Army (eerste cijfer 3) en afkomstig was uit de regio van het zesde korps (tweede cijfer 6).

Helaas is zijn dossier over zijn diensttijd bij een brand in het National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis op 12 juli 1973 verloren gegaan. Hierdoor is het lastig tot bijna onmogelijk is om deze periode te beschrijven. Tevens sprak hij niet veel over de oorlog.

Zijn zelfgemaakt vest verteld echter meer over de eenheden en jaartallen waarin hij in deze eenheden gediend heeft.

  • 1941-1943 5th Armored Division
  • 1944 82nd Airborne Division
  • 1944 17th Airborne Division
  • 1944 XIX Corps
  • 1945 XVI Corps
  • 1945 Ninth Army
  • 1945 Seventh Army

Verder is het volgende over zijn diensttijd bekend:

Een tijd heeft hij ingedeeld gezeten bij het HQ (hoofdkwartier) van de 17th Airborne Division en had de Glider Wings badge ontvangen. Deze badge werd uitgereikt als je tenminste één glider (zweefvliegtuig) landing tijdens gevechtsomstandigheden had gemaakt of als je alle vaardigheidstests die hieraan verbonden waren doorlopen had. Samen met de 17th Airborne Division werd hij naar de Belgische Ardennen gestuurd, waar de Duitsers op 16 december 1944 hun laatste grote offensief op het westfront uitvoerden.

Zijn bijnaam die hij in de oorlog had gekregen was: The Sidewinder. Genoemd naar de gelijknamige slang. Deze bijnaam had hij gekregen doordat hij aan het front en ook achter de vijandelijke linies als de gelijknamige slang te werk ging.

Hij was muzikaal aangelegd (speelde diverse instrumenten) en speelde hierdoor in een legerband.

Het zware accent bleef hem tijdens de oorlog parten spelen. Zo was er op een dag het volgende voorval. Tijdens een missie had hij belangrijke informatie die hij aan zijn superieuren moest rapporteren. Maar onderweg werd hij door eigen troepen tegengehouden. Door het zware accent vertrouwde de Amerikaanse soldaten het niet. Een Amerikaanse soldaat riep: “If you’re an American, I’m Santa Claus”. Hierna moest hij een kuil graven en er in gaan staan. Op dat ogenblik kwam er een jeep aangereden en de chauffeur die hem herkende, zag hem in de kuil staan. De chauffeur stopte en riep: “What are you doing in that hole, Sarge? We have to get going!”. Hierop vertelde Von Henke dat hij zou worden neergeschoten. De chauffeur sprong uit de jeep en vertelde de soldaten dat hij belangrijke informatie had en dat ze hem niet mochten neerschieten. Bij het wegrijden hoorden ze de achtergebleven soldaten nog “Ho Ho Ho” roepen.

Maanden later, inmiddels ingedeeld bij het Military Intelligence Service van het XVI Corps, kreeg Von Henke op dinsdag 27 februari 1945 de opdracht om zich de volgende dag in Linne te melden bij de inlichtingenofficier van het 15th Cavalry Squadron, Captain Paul Williams. Op 28 februari werden er plannen gemaakt voor een nachtelijke verkenningsmissie naar Roermond. In de middag van 28 februari bleek uit G-2 (intelligence) rapporten van het XVI Corps dat de Duitsers zich uit Roermond hadden terug getrokken. Von Henke zou samen met B Troop (15th Cavalry Squadron) van Captain Bob Hamsley die avond op weg gaan naar Roermond en proberen de oever van de Roer te bereiken.

Von Henke schreef na de oorlog het volgende over zijn aankomst in Roermond: “In the cellar of a destroyed factory near Merum I had a briefing with men of Captain Hamsley whose Troop B was to advance to the edge of Roer river later that night. In the darkness of the early morning March 1st, I slid down the cement slab of the blown-up bridge on the Maastrichtsche weg, and worked my way up the other side of the destroyed bridge. I was in Roermond… somewhat on the cold and wet side. Infantry men rigged up rubber boat and got over the Roer River shortly thereafter. On the edge of the town square was a building with red cross painted on the door. Inside of it I found many of town’s women and children, scared and cold. I asked them in German language, whether they had seen any enemy soldiers near-by. It took them sometime to realise that it was not a German but an American soldier talking to them.”.

Voor diverse acties achter de vijandelijke linies kreeg Von Henke de Bronze Star medaille en het bijbehorende getuigschrift ondertekend door Major General John B Anderson uitgereikt.

Op woensdag 6 juni 1945 was Von Henke uitgenodigd bij een officiële plechtigheid ter ere van de bevrijders van Roermond. Tijdens deze plechtigheid kreeg hij op de markt voor het stadhuis het stadswapen in glas in lood uitgereikt. Ook Major General John B Anderson was aanwezig. Naar Major General Anderson is een deel van de Maastrichterweg vernoemd. De 15th Cavalry Group nam deel aan de optocht door de stad.

Na de oorlog ging Von Henke weer in zijn vaders bedrijf (American Electric Fusion Corporation in Chicago) werken en reisde hij als verkoper over de hele wereld om de producten die zijn vader uitgevonden en geproduceerd had, te verkopen. Hij sprak zeven talen. Vaak kwam hij thuis met souvenirs uit de diverse landen die hij bezocht had. Tevens werd hij directeur van een ontwenningskliniek voor alcoholisten in het Northeast Community Hospital in Chicago.

In juni 1966 trouwde hij uiteindelijk met Jane, die hij al voor de oorlog had leren kennen. Jane had 2 kinderen.

Met diverse mensen uit Roermond en omgeving onderhield hij na de oorlog contact. In 1982 bracht hij een bezoek aan Roermond, de stad waar hij na de oorlog nog veel aan moest denken.

Vincent Astor von Henke is op 24 juli 1990 op 77 jarige leeftijd gestorven.

Op 1 maart 2015 is er in de nabijheid van de Michielsbrug in Roermond een plaquette onthuld ter nagedachtenis aan Vincent von Henke en de bevrijding op 1 maart 1945.

Speciale dank gaat uit naar Janice Amos (Verenigde Staten), Jeffery Riddel (Verenigde Staten) en Jan van der Steen (Nederland) voor het verstrekken van bovenstaande informatie en foto’s.
Om het verhaal van Vincent von Henke zo compleet mogelijk te maken, is meer informatie welkom. Mocht u meer informatie hebben en willen delen, dan kunt u contact opnemen middels het contact formulier op de homepagina.

Artikel door: Richard van Kessel

 

Vincent von Henke op de markt in Roermond op 6 juni 1945. Foto: Gemeentearchief Roermond

Vincent von Henke in 1978 met het wapen van Roermond in glas en lood. Artikel Chicago Tribune

Vincent von Henke tijdens zijn bezoek aan Roermond in 1982. Artikel Dagblad De Limburger

Plaquette Vincent von Henke brug. Foto: R van Kessel